08.08.2020»»суббота

Macos Afp Asks For Administrator Credentials Repeatedly

08.08.2020
Macos Afp Asks For Administrator Credentials Repeatedly Average ratng: 6,2/10 6984 votes

Mountafp is a program launched by mount when specified witht the afp type. I'd suppose the options are the same as the mount options (for example, read-only access, etc.). From the man page for mount. Jan 15, 2020  1Password is good, but there are many others to choose from, including LastPass, Dashlane, and mSecure.If you want to find more password management options, open the Mac App Store and search for the word password.If any of the apps look interesting, check the manufacturer's website.

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  1. Macos Afp Asks For Administrator Credentials Repeatedly Job

That brings me back. I'd go with SMB for the simple reason that I'd trust Apple or whoever to correctly implement SMB before I'd trust Microsoft or whoever to properly implement AFP. Not because of relative competence, but because AFP is strange, and does things in unexpected ways. I've implemented an AFP server, so learned this the hard.

Hi, I'm trying to write a script that dumps some backup files across a network to a Mac running OS 9.0.4. Technically, I can do this manually by going through Aqua, and the Go > Connect to Server menu choice. This uses afp to connect to the computer, and then I can transfer information freely. But I want this to all be done from a shell script. Obviously, 'curl' does not support afp as a protocal, so I can't use that.. anyone have any ideas?
As I do this using Aqua, I can check my console.log file, which shows an entry:
userSelectedURL is afp:/at/Akira:*
where Akira is the name of the computer I'm connecting to.
I don't know if this contains any clues or not, but I'd love to find out if this CAN be done from the UNIX interface.
Thanks in advance!

Mount AFP volumes from the terminal 13 comments Create New Account
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apple implemented a mount script called 'mount_afp' located in /sbin. sadly they got no man-page for it, so i cannot imagine what they mean with -o [option]..

mount_afs, mount_nfs, mount_ufs, etc. come from the BSD world. mount(1) is just a wrapper that calls one of these based on how you've set the '-t' flag. It's there for conveinence's sake.
Chris

Macos Afp Asks For Administrator Credentials Repeatedly Job

mount_afp is a program launched by mount when specified witht the afp type. I'd suppose the options are the same as the mount options (for example, read-only access, etc.). From the man page for mount:
If the type is not one of the internally known types, mount will
attempt to execute a program in /sbin/mount_XXX where XXX is re-
placed by the type name. For example, nfs filesystems are mount-
ed by the program /sbin/mount_nfs.
HTH.

You can use AutomountMaker

mount_afs, mount_nfs, mount_ufs, etc. come from the BSD world. mount(1) is just a wrapper that calls one of these based on how you've set the '-t' flag. It's there for conveinence's sake.
Chris

This is a GREAT tip. The only problem I'm having with it is that it doesn't seem to allow the finder to 'see' the volumes. I have tried messing with the privleges and owner using chown and chmod, but nothing seems to allow me to view the file server in the finder and have it show up like a server would if I mounted it through the finder. Does anyone have any ideas on how to make this happen? I've tried various combinations of chown and chmod, but to no avail.
Thanks
Eric

Run 'disktool -r' after mounting the AFP volume. This causes the Disk Arbitration system
to refresh its volume list, which then causes the Finder to update.

Thanks to Xil for the missing piece!!! now I have a little script that rudimentarily allows me to mount my local server. Theoretically, this could be put in Startup items and run automatically, though I'm planning on adding some checking to make sure that the server is not already mounted. (Right now its blind setup and will give errors). At any rate, I thought I'd pass it on to anyone who might be interested. Basically, this is a perl script that can be created by naming it according to the server you attach to (mine is called 'homemount' .) So, copy the following, then go to the unix command line, type pico homemount, do a paste, change the variables appropriately, save and quit, do a 'chmod +x homemount' , and you should be able to load that server with one command. (since it is a bad idea to hard code your server password in, the program prompts you for that)
I'll repost later when I get around to adding in all the checking that probably should be here, but if anyone else wants to do it, I'd be grateful.
best,
Eric
script follows
#!/usr/bin/env perl
##script mounts server volumes
##all variables are right now defined statically, except server password
##which is passed as argument
##from unix command line
## mountserver.pl _serverpassword_
###
###
[email protected][0];
$local_mount_point='/Volumes/server-drive';
$local_user='eric';
$local_group='admin';
$server_user='eric';
$server_mountpoint='/server';
$server_ip='10.0.2.5';
$server_volume='server';
system ('sudo mkdir $local_mount_point');
system ('sudo chown $local_user:$local_group $local_mount_point');
system ('chmod +rwx $local_mount_point');
system ('sudo mount -t afp afp://$server_user:[email protected]$server_ip/$server_volume $local_mount_point');
system ('disktool -r');

To add to this great hint, the above examples mount the remote volume as root, and as available to everyone.
Note that you don't have to do it this way.
For example, you could mount a remote volume that'd be only accessible by yourself.
here's how to do this with a directory called disk that's at the root of your home directory.
mkdir disk
mount -t afp afp://user:[email protected]/volume_to_mount ~/disk
see how there is no sudo involved in the mount command.
Here, I get a few kextload warnings, but don't mind them.
PS the non-accessibility of ~/disk depends on the permission you've set to your home directory ;-)

I have an airport network at home and I want to mount each other's disks on each computer so I can have the webserver on one dole out images from my pictures directory stored on the other computer. I found your tip and figured I'd found the solution. However, I got an error. The following is edited for privacy: Note, I get a different error depending on how I enter my password. I've mounted nfs volumes successfully on a different computer at work and never ran into this problem. Any ideas?
Thanks, Rob

I tested this hint to mount AFP Volumes of OS9 Mac via terminal:
% cd ~
% mkdir ~/afptemp
% mount_afp -i afp://[email protected]/Volume_name ~/afptemp
at the promt type password, no password type enter; then:
% cd ~/afptemp
% ls
you can see the files of Volume_name, to unmount:
% cd .
% umount ~/afptemp
Attention: ~/afptemp will be deteted.
Example:
% mount_afp afp://[email protected]/Macintosh%20HD ~/afptemp
where 'at_name' can be found with atlookup command:
% atlookup
ff94.f9.30 pippo:Multi-User Client
ff94.f9.04 pippo:Workstation
ff94.f9.04 pippo:ShareWayIP
ff94.f9.f8 pippo:AFPServer

Macos
One can mount into a user writable folder (like home folder) this way, sudo command (and password typing) is not necessary and it's easier to script ( => it's not interactive)

I can't get any of this to work. It looks like it works (I don't get any errors or anything), but nothing shows up. No connections. :-(

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